Last edited by Malarisar
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Blind Jack of Knaresborough, road builder extraordinary found in the catalog.

Blind Jack of Knaresborough, road builder extraordinary

Garry Hogg

Blind Jack of Knaresborough, road builder extraordinary

by Garry Hogg

  • 5 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Phoenix House in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Metcalf, John, 1717-1810.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementwith 8 illustrations in text by James Hunt.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHE363.G73 M44
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 145 p.
    Number of Pages145
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5575384M
    LC Control Number67086474

    The first was in the town square itself as I made the acquaintance of Blind Jack of Knaresborough. Blind Jack was John Metcalf who lived a long life from until He was the most interesting of men, living a life without sight and yet achieving national fame as a road-maker and surveyor during the Industrial Revolution. John Metcalf (–), also known as Blind Jack of Knaresborough or Blind Jack Metcalf, was the first professional road builder to emerge in Britain during the Industrial Revolution. Blind from the age of six, John had an eventful life, which was well documented by his .

    One of the pioneers of road construction was the extraordinary figure of Jack Metcalf from Knaresborough in Yorkshire. Blind from the age of six, Metcalf already had a colourful career as a fiddle-player, soldier, gambler and trader before setting up in the s as a haulier of goods from Leeds to Manchester and Knaresborough to York. Blind Jack of Knaresborough. In the churchyard is the grave of John 'Blind Jack' Metcalfe of Knaresborough. Metcalfe, born in , suffered an attack of smallpox at the age of six. He survived but was left blind. He refused to let the ailment stop him, and carved out a remarkable career as an engineer and prolific road-builder.

    Blind Jack seems to have been self taught regarding his road-building career and was lucky in that the Turnpike Acts had been passed in Parliament. The first stretch of road he worked on was that between Harrogate and Knaresborough, where he first tried out his method of crossing marshes and bogs.   Given the then strange idea that a blind man could be a detective, Bramah much later compared his hero’s achievements to those of real life blind people such as Nicholas Saunderson, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge, Blind Jack of Knaresborough the road builder, John Fielding the Bow Street Magistrate of whom it was said he could Reviews:


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Blind Jack of Knaresborough, road builder extraordinary by Garry Hogg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Blind Jack of Knaresborough, road buider extraordinary. by HOGG, Gary. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Get this from a library. Blind Jack of Knaresborough, road builder extraordinary.

[Garry Hogg]. Blind Jack Of Knaresborough The extraordinary true story of 18th-century John Metcalf. Born blind and in poverty, John - known as Blind Jack - led a wild, adventurous life as a gambler, a pugilist.

John Metcalf (15 August –26 April ), known as Blind Jack of Knaresborough or Blind Jack Metcalf, was the first professional road builder to emerge during the Industrial from the age of six, Metcalf had an eventful life, which was documented by his own account just before his death.

He was an accomplished diver, swimmer, card player and fiddler, but was better known Born: 15 AugustKnaresborough, Yorkshire. Jack was made blind at the age of 6, but he subsequently had careers as a guide, musician, soldier, trader, and most famously of all, a road builder.

Additionally he has an `interesting' personal life (e.g. got a woman pregnant while having another girlfriend, eloping with his true love, playing and winning at cards, brawling, and living to 92 5/5(5). Blind Jack Metcalf, a renowned 18th century road-builder, was an extraordinary, larger-than-life Yorkshireman whose achievements were accomplished despite being blind from the age of six, as a.

So valued by Knaresborough’s locals is their legendary road-builder that in they raised £30, to have his tall, portly figure immortalized in bronze by Barbara Asquith. Grasping a surveyor’s wheel in his right hand, Jack’s statue sits on a bench Blind Jack of Knaresborough the town centre, just outside the Blind Jack’s Pub.

15 August Road-builder ‘Blind Jack’ is born road builder extraordinary book Knaresborough Born into a poor family in North Yorkshire on 15 AugustJohn Metcalf was left blind. A pioneering 18th century road-builder, Blind Jack of Knaresborough, as he came to be known, was responsible for the construction of around miles of road in the north of England, supporting.

Blind Jack of Knaresborough The story begins with a newspaper article in the Maidenhead Advertiser dated 28 Januaryentitled ‘Blind Jack’s Mug’. Here is a summary: Among the possessions of Mr & Mrs Walker was a white mug they never used.

Slightly chipped here and there, but Mrs Walker would never part with it. Blind Jack's. 1, likes talking about this 7, were here. Pub/Bar. We stopped off in Knaresborough as we'd been in the car for a while and wanted a leg stretch.

We came across Blind Jack's and thought it looked like it would be good so popped in. My other half enjoys ales more than me but I had a lovely half pint of a grapefruit beer. Nice / TripAdvisor reviews. Knaresborough is preparing to honour the Tri-Centenary of the town’s famous son who overcame disability to become one of the North’s most influential road builders.

Blind Jack, whose real name was John Metcalf, lost his sight at the age of 6 from smallpox but went on to develop some of the region’s most important transport [ ]. Knaresborough has a fascinating and varied history. Its roots go back centuries and throughout its long history it has been peopled with a wealth of characters, from Hugh de Morville, murderer of Thomas Beckett on the steps of his cathedral at Canterbury, to Blind Jack, the world renowned road builder.

Jack built roads in five counties and his roadbuilding career would last for decades, but Manchester Road, completed inturned out to be the last of Jack’s turnpike roads. Statue tribute to Blind Jack, surveyor’s wheel in hand, in his native Knaresborough Jack’s last road was also a losing venture for him.

Although the project paid. Online shopping from a great selection at Books Store. Skip to main Blind Jack of Knaresborough, road builder extraordinary.

by Garry Hogg | 1 Jan Hardcover Country Crafts and craftsmen. by Garry Hogg | 1 Jan Max Carrados is a fictional blind detective in a series of mystery stories and books by Ernest Bramah, first published in The Max Carrados stories appeared alongside Sherlock Holmes stories in the Strand was often billed above Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Carrados stories frequently outsold the Holmes stories at the time, even if they failed to achieve the same longevity.

Blind Jack lost his sight at the age of 6 from smallpox but went on to develop some of the region’s most important transport links, including his first section of road, when he built in /53 between Minskip and Ferrensby a three mile route between the towns of Knaresborough.

Collated from Jisc from a copy held at the York Minster. A biography on the life of John Metcalf, who was also known as Blind Jack of Knaresborough or Blind Jack Metcalf. Metcalf was the first professional road builder during the Industrial Revolution.

He was blind from the age of six, when he lost his sight after a smallpox infection. In the book about Metcalf's life, the properties were described as being "9 yards wide, 23 [yards] long, and 21 feet from the foundation to the square of the building, with chimneys or pipes." Blind Jack of Knaresborough retired to Spofforth, Yorkshire, and died there on 26 April aged The epitaph on his headstone reads.

Local hero Blind Jack, was born John Metcalfe in and was best known as a pioneering road builder, pre-dating Telford and Macadam, even though he lost his sight at the age of six.John Metcalf (–), also known as Blind Jack of Knaresborough or Blind Jack Metcalf, was the first professional road builder to emerge during the Industrial Revolution.

Blind from the age of six, John had an eventful life, which was well documented by his own account just before his death. In the period to he built about miles ( km) of turnpike road, mainly in the.Given the then strange idea that a blind man could be a detective, Bramah much later compared his hero’s achievements to those of real life blind people such as Nicholas Saunderson, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge, Blind Jack of Knaresborough the road builder, John Fielding the Bow Street Magistrate of whom it was said he could.